Next Membership Meeting: Dr. Jaye McCracken

Next Membership Meeting:

Jaye L. McCracken, DVM

Rhodococcus equi

Wednesday, March 22nd, 2017 at Copper Roux

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Dr. McCracken attended Cornell College of Veterinary Medicine and graduated in 1999. She completed a rotating internship at Hagyard and then continued on as Field Care Associate.She was trained in veterinary acupuncture through IVAS in 2006. Dr. McCracken is dedicated to veterinary education and is very involved in young vet development. She also actively purses the advancement of equine field care through various research projects, primarily focused on Rhodococcus equi in foals. She has published papers, book chapters and given lectures on the topic. She has also been an active voice for general foal field care. Her interests are in field medicine, herd health, broodmare management, neonatal care, medical ultrasonography, and field emergency and critical care.

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• RSVP’s must be in by 5 p.m. Sunday, March 19th, 2017.
• No RSVP’s will be taken after the deadline.
• We no longer reserve extra seating for walk-ins – please check ahead for space created by cancellations
• Registration begins at 6:15 P.M. at Copper Roux
• Dinner begins at 7:00 P.M.
• Cash, Check and Credit Card payments accepted at the door.
• Please list names of all attendees when making reservations.
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CLICK HERE TO REGISTER!

Don’t forget this meeting is also a Pint Night!

February Membership Meeting

Next Membership Meeting:

Kristina G. Lu, VMD, DACT

“Recent Topics in Reproduction”

Thursday, February 23rd, 2017 at Copper Roux

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Dr. Lu was raised in Philadelphia, PA. After practicing in Chester County, PA, she came to Hagyard in 2005. Her passion is Theriogenology (Animal Reproduction Specialist). Her proudest personal accomplishment is having cycled from Santa Monica to Washington D.C. with her Dad.

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• RSVP’s must be in by 5 p.m. Monday, February 20th, 2017.
• No RSVP’s will be taken after the deadline.
• We no longer reserve extra seating for walk-ins – please check ahead for space created by cancellations
• Registration begins at 6:15 P.M. at Copper Roux
• Dinner begins at 7:00 P.M.
• Cash, Check and Credit Card payments accepted at the door.
• Please list names of all attendees when making reservations.
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Members who have paid there 2017 dues will be ablel to pick up their 2017 KTFMC Directory at the meeting!

Pay your dues at: https://ktfmc.org/membership-dues/

Make sure you list all members’ names in the bottom box that are included in the dues payment.

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Thoroughbred Worker Health and Safety Study results in free bilingual safety materials

By Jess Miller Clouser

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 25, 2017) — Using direct input from horse farm employees, managers, and owners, a group of researchers based at the University of Kentucky College of Public Health and the University of Maryland, Baltimore has put together a set of bilingual safety training materials* designed to equip horse farm managers and workers with information needed to stay safe on the job.

The Thoroughbred Worker Health and Safety Study was a five-year research project aimed to improve the occupational safety and health of Thoroughbred farmworkers. The study was co-led by Jess Miller Clouser, MPH, UK College of Public Health, and Jennifer Swanberg, PhD, Professor of Social Work, University of Maryland. The project was funded by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as part of the University of Kentucky (UK) Southeast Center for Agricultural Health and Injury Prevention.

The research consisted of three phases: 1) 32 surveys and 26 in-depth interviews were conducted with farm owners, managers, and human resource personnel about the work environment and context of injuries and illnesses experienced by workers; 2) community-based surveys were conducted with 225 Latino Thoroughbred farmworkers about their experiences of the work environment and occupational injury and illness; and 3) an industry and community-engaged process was utilized to create educational materials based on study data to provide to farms and workers.

The research team is now releasing the three main educational materials resulting from this research. These materials are available on the project’s website at http://www.workersafetyandhealth.com/information-for-managers/

Safety on the Farm: A bilingual guide in images for the Thoroughbred worker

This series of 12 bilingual, graphic safety illustrations may be used as a training booklet or safety posters and aims to help educate both English and Spanish-speaking workers about safety procedures on Thoroughbred farms and provide a shared language of safety. To create the content of the illustrations, the research team convened a working group of eight industry representatives including farm managers from small, medium, and large Thoroughbred farms; workers’ compensation and insurance representatives; human resource personnel; and communications associates.

Randy Gilbert, the farm manager at Shawnee Farm, former president of the Kentucky Thoroughbred Farm Managers’ Club and a member of the project’s Industry Advisory Council, was a participant in the working group that drafted the safety illustrations.

“At Shawnee Farm every year we have guys that come on visas to work with the horses and maintenance and communication is key for safety. These safety posters will definitely help with communication,” said Gilbert.

Laurette Durick, human resources manager at Godolphin also served on both the project’s industry advisory council and working group for the safety illustrations.

“These safety posters and booklets are fantastic. This is a first of its kind, as I have never seen anything like this for horse handling and the equine industry,” said Durick.

Tom Evans, owner and manager of Trackside Farm and member of the safety illustration working group added, “I would wager that my employees are 100 times more likely to study an illustration versus read text.  I think the illustrations provoke thought and show our employees that somebody cares about their safety.”

From the Field: Promising health and safety practices on Thoroughbred farms

In the in-depth interviews conducted with Thoroughbred farm representatives, participants described promising practices they employed to help improve employee safety and well-being, especially among non-English speaking workers. The From the Field report details those practices as a vehicle for farms to learn from one another.

Research briefs that communicate study findings

Participating farms often stated that they wanted to learn what the study’s findings were. Main findings have been summarized in a series of 10 research briefs that are organized by topic area (e.g., injuries, respiratory symptoms, communication, musculoskeletal discomfort) and are available at http://www.workersafetyandhealth.com/issue-briefs/.

All materials are accessible for free on the project website at www.workersafetyandhealth.com. As funding permits, printed copies of the materials may also become available.  If you have questions about the materials or would like to put your name on a waitlist for printed materials, please contact Jess Miller Clouser at jess.clouser@uky.edu.

*While these materials were created with and for the Thoroughbred industry, they may be relevant to other occupational or recreational groups. We provide permission for their use in other disciplines, but do not imply that the procedures depicted are universally applicable to all industries or contexts.

January Membership Meeting- Senator Ralph Alvarado

Next Membership Meeting:

Senator Ralph A. Alvarado

January 25th, 2017
at Fasig-Tipton

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Ralph A. Alvarado (born April 30, 1970) is an American physician and Republican politician. He serves as member of the Kentucky Senate from the 28th District (Clark, Fayette, Montgomery counties), being first elected in 2014.  He is the first Hispanic elected to the Kentucky General Assembly; his father is from Costa Rica and his mother is from Argentina.

Alvarado was born in San Francisco and raised in Pacifica and San Jose, California. He graduated from Bellarmine College Preparatory in San Jose in 1988.  He graduated from Loma Linda University in 1990 with a Bachelor of Science degree in biology and completed an MD from the same university in 1994.  He completed his residency at the University of Kentucky Chandler Medical Center.

He spoke at the 2016 Republican National Convention on the third night of the Convention.

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 • RSVP’s must be in by 5 p.m. January 22nd, 2017.
• No RSVP’s will be taken after the deadline.
• Walk-in seating very limited.
• Registration begins at 6:15 P.M. at Fasig Tipton
• Dinner begins at 7:00 P.M.
• Cash, Check and Credit Card payments accepted at the door.
• Please list names of all attendees when making reservations.
Do NOT RSVP by  Email,  follow the appropriate link below to guarantee your RSVP will be received.

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From the TDN about H-2B

Feds on Brink of Helping–or Hurting–Industry Employers

bath_backstretch_worker_scenic_groom_suds_sponge_web_sarah_andrew
Sarah K. Andrew photo

By T. D. Thornton

The inclusion–or not–of about 20 words in a massive stopgap federal funding bill this week could have far-reaching consequences for United States Thoroughbred industry employers who rely on foreign workers for hands-on, day-to-day horse care at racetracks, training centers, and breeding farms.

At issue is the reinstatement of the H-2B visa “returning worker” exemption that lawmakers recently allowed to lapse into inactivity.

The need for the H-2B exemption is by no means limited to the Thoroughbred industry. It affects numerous other industries in which the work is hard, the hours are long, and the pay is traditionally low.

Without the exemption, federal law caps at 66,000 the total number of foreign nationals who can be issued an H-2B visa during a fiscal year for the purpose of coming into the country to work for up to 10 months provided they then return to their home countries.

However, under the proposed reactivation of the H-2B exemption that is backed by both the National Thoroughbred Racing Association (NTRA) and the National Horsemen’s Benevolent and Protective Association (NHBPA), if employers are able to demonstrate that a worker has qualified for the H-2B program in any of the three previous years, that worker does not count against the 66,000 federal cap.

So put another way, if the exemption goes back into effect, it will make it much easier for trainers and farm managers to hire or re-hire workers from other countries for jobs that might otherwise go unfilled by American workers.

“The detrimental cause that could come into play should the H-2B exemption not be included could be very problematic for our industry as a whole,” said NHBPA chief executive officer Eric Hamelback. “I think we all know that our labor force is very dependent on migrant workers, and having these individuals continue to be here obviously is something that we as an industry need to push for and continue to ring the bell for in Washington to let people know how important this is to us.”

NTRA and NHBPA officials are jointly underscoring the urgency for horse industry employers to let elected officials know how important the H-2B exemption is to them. That’s because lawmakers are attempting to avoid a government shutdown prior to Dec. 9 by passing stopgap spending legislation to fund numerous federal agencies and programs before adjourning the 114th Congress, and the language that reinstates the H-2B exemption is in danger of not making it into that bill.

NTRA president Alex Waldrop said that without an exception to the H-2B cap, the Thoroughbred industry will face an onslaught of competition from other industries for the very limited number (66,000) of available visas that are available in fiscal year 2017.

“Keep in mind, these are not immigrants. These are not people who are trying to get a green card. These are not people who are asking to come to the U.S. permanently,” Waldrop explained. “These are people who are coming as temporary workers. They have to return [to their home country] at least two months out of the year, and [their jobs] have to be seasonal in nature. These are simply foreign workers who are allowed to come and work the jobs that Americans don’t want and that employers can’t fill.”

Waldrop said the H-2B exemption had been in effect through the 2016 fiscal year, which ran through Sept. 30. But when federal lawmakers failed to pass a budget for the 2017 fiscal year, they instead relied on a “continuing resolution” (CR) to fund the federal government. That CR (not a federal statute) only ran through Dec. 9, and didn’t include the H-2B exemption. With that deadline looming this week, lawmakers are under the gun to pass another CR to keep the government afloat through at least March 31, and Waldrop (like the leaders of many other organizations representing myriad industries) wants the H-2B language put back in.

Not having the H-2B exemption in place for the past eight weeks hasn’t brought about an adverse impact on the Thoroughbred industry because it’s a slow time in the sport for hiring workers, Waldrop said. But life could get a lot more difficult for trainers and farm managers come Jan. 1 when hiring traditionally picks up if that language isn’t included in this week’s CR.

“If [a horse industry employer] can’t take advantage of the exemption between [Jan. 1] and Mar. 31, you’re effectively out of luck,” Waldrop said, because the 66,000 quota is quickly filled. “[The H-2B extension] needs to be done now, otherwise we won’t have the workers we need.”

Neither Waldrop nor Hamelback could cite a ballpark number of H-2B workers that have traditionally been covered by the exemption.

“I don’t have that number,” Waldrop said. “All I know is that trainers say that a large number of their employees that they hire are eligible for the H-2B program. What we don’t know is how many are here under the program, and how many are here without documentation. And frankly, that’s just not something that people talk a lot about.”

Waldrop continued: “The best case scenario is that the House appropriations committee, which is meeting this week, will decide to put the exemption language back in the CR, the language that has been in place the entire 2016 fiscal year…and the industry could continue to rely on that exemption when recruiting foreign workers. It’s about 20 words that they need to include. There’s no mystery about what that language is, it’s just whether they will do it or not.

“The worst case is that they will not put it in, and decide that they will not ever go back to an exemption program for these returning workers. It’s conceivable that we could lose this battle [but] maybe come back in March and convince them to put it into the next CR that will fund until through the end of September next year, but that’s unlikely. It’s one of those situations where we need to win now, or we’re probably going to be out of luck for the entire fiscal year.”

When asked if he thought that not having the H-2B exemption would trigger a federal crackdown (ie backstretch raids targeting illegal employees), Waldrop said, “I don’t think it would be much of a change in terms of enforcement, but what it will do is it will deplete or dry up the H-2B program for trainers who want to be in compliance with the law, and they’re going to be forced into the very bad decision to either hire undocumented workers or not have the staff to handle the horses.”

To assist Thoroughbred industry employers who want to express support for the H-2B exemption, the NHBPA is circulating a flier with instructions on contacting federal lawmakers. It reads, in part:

“Call Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell at (202) 224-2541 and House Appropriations Committee chair Rep. Hal Rogers at (202) 225-4601….Once connected to the office, ask to speak to the person who handles H-2B issues. Tell them Congress must understand that a failure to reinstate the H-2B returning worker exemption before March of next year will hurt the horse-racing industry and will result in the loss of jobs.

“If you can’t get through, leave a message on the lines of ‘Failure to reinstate the H-2B returning worker exemption before next March will cost the horse industry jobs. We need the exemption reinstated now.’ Leave your name, your job title and a contact number.

“If you have a Twitter account, please tweet #saveH2B to @SenateMajLdr and @RepHalRogers with a message on the lines of ‘Include returning worker exemption to H-2B program in CR–jobs are at stake!’ Another to tag is @HouseAppropsGOP. Don’t assume someone else will do this for you. Please share this message.”

@thorntontd

Article URL: http://www.thoroughbreddailynews.com/feds-on-brink-of-helping-or-hurting-industry-employers/

Last chance to register for the KTFMC Leadership Conference

2016 KTFMC Leadership Conference

“Leaders become great, not because of their power,
but because of their ability to empower other people” ~ John Maxwell

Registration Deadline is 11/18/2016

Download Conference flier here

Download Conference Agenda here


 When:
November 21st and 22nd
9:00 am to 4:30 pm
Where:
Fasig Tipton
Food:
A light breakfast and lunch will be provided
Cost:
$50/person
(Down from $100 last year, thanks to our sponsors!)

The goal of the seminar is to teach modern leadership skills to current and future management, including:

-Focus on identifying different personalities and managing them in an effective manner
-Managing conflict and the art of negotiation
-Effective communication with employees, clients and media
-Motivation and performance management
-Learning proper HR procedure

Featuring:  Dr. Steve Isaacs, University of Kentucky
Dr. Will Snell, University of Kentucky.
Grace Gorrell will be teaching “True Colors”

Keynote Speaker:  Dr. Bob Milligan, Professor Emeritus from Cornell University,
“Application of Management Principles to Farm Management”

Food:  A light breakfast and lunch will be provided

Brought to you by:

cba-2newgodolphin-logo-blue-highres_cmyk

 

Leadership Seminar

2016 KTFMC Leadership Conference

“Leaders become great, not because of their power,
but because of their ability to empower other people” ~ John Maxwell

Download a flier here


 When:
November 21st and 22nd
9:00 am to 4:30 pm
Where:
Fasig Tipton
Food:
A light breakfast and lunch will be provided
Cost:
$50/person
(Down from $100 last year, thanks to our sponsors!)

The goal of the seminar is to teach modern leadership skills to current and future management, including:

-Focus on identifying different personalities and managing them in an effective manner
-Managing conflict and the art of negotiation
-Effective communication with employees, clients and media
-Motivation and performance management
-Learning proper HR procedure

Featuring:  Dr. Steve Isaacs, University of Kentucky
Dr. Will Snell, University of Kentucky.
Grace Gorrell will be teaching “True Colors”

Keynote Speaker:  Dr. Bob Milligan, Professor Emeritus from Cornell University,
“Application of Management Principles to Farm Management”

Food:  A light breakfast and lunch will be provided

Brought to you by:

cba-2newgodolphin-logo-blue-highres_cmyk

 

Vote for the 2017 KTFMC Officers and Board Members

2017 Officers & Directors Ballot

Cast your vote by November 4th, 2016

Paper Ballots must be mailed or faxed. Fax (502) 867-1723 or mail to:
KTFMC / 1005 Richmond Road / Lexington, KY 40502
No Phone calls or e-mails will be counted. One vote per member.
Deadline is 5 PM Friday November 4th. Ballots faxed or postmarked after 11/04/16 will not be counted. Make sure to vote early.
Winners will be announced at the KTFMC December Dinner Dance.

President:
Vice-President:*
Treasurer:
Secretary:*
Sergeant at Arms:
Board Members (select 3):*
Member's Name:*
Member's E-mail:*

 

Next Membership Meeting: Dr. Brian D. Nielsen

Next Membership Meeting, October 11th at Copper Roux

Dr. Brian D. Nielsen

Critical factors influencing equine skeletal strength:  

What research has shown us


Dr. Brian D. Nielsen completed his undergraduate degree in Animal Science at the University of Wisconsin – River Falls and received both his M.S. and Ph.D. from Texas A&M University.  He currently is a professor of Equine Exercise Physiology in the Department of Animal Science at Michigan State University where he has a teaching and research appointment.  Dr. Nielsen has authored over 50 peer-reviewed papers and nearly 200 book chapters, conference papers, and abstracts, and has secured $1.5 million in research funding.  In addition, he has often been invited to speak to various audiences having given 39 invited international talks in countries such as Austria, Brazil, Canada, England, France, Germany, Mexico, Northern Ireland, Norway, Spain, Slovenia, Sweden, and the United Arab Emirates.  He also has given dozens of invited talks at national meetings and 57 invited talks within the state of Michigan.  He frequently writes articles for popular press publications such as the Thoroughbred Times, Speedhorse, and the American Quarter Horse Racing Journal. He is an active member of the American Society of Animal Science, the American Registry of Professional Animal Scientists, and served as the President of the Equine Science Society – an organization that presented him with the “Outstanding Young Equine Professional Award” in 2001.  Additionally, he was awarded the “Outstanding Teacher Award” at the Midwest Section of the American Society of Animal Science and the American Dairy Science Association in 2005 and the “Equine Science Award” by the American Society of Animal Science and Equine Science Society in 2010.  Besides being on the editorial board for the Journal of Animal Science, The Professional Animal Scientist, and the international journal Comparative Exercise Physiology, he is a Diplomat in the American College of Animal Nutritionists and served on the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Nutrient Requirements of Horses.


• RSVP’s must be in by 5 p.m. October 9th, 2016.
• No RSVP’s will be taken after the deadline.
• Walk-in seating very limited.
• Registration begins at 6:15 P.M. at Copper Roux
• Dinner begins at 7:00 P.M.
• Cash, Check and Credit Card payments accepted at the door.
• Please list names of all attendees when making reservations.
• Do NOT RSVP by  Email,  follow the appropriate link below to guarantee your RSVP will be received.

register-now

5K Registration Reminder

KTFMC 5K Registration

Sign up at: https://ktfmc.org/2016-5k/

Registration ends September 15, 2016 at 11:59pm EDT

Registration Fee: $25

Logo 2Join us Saturday, October 1, 2016 for the inaugural Kentucky Thoroughbred Farm Manager’s 5k, presented by Vetoquinol.

We are excited to announce that our host farm this year is scenic Ashford Stud, the home of Triple Crown winner American Pharoah! Walkers, trotters, gallopers, and sprinters of all ages are welcome, but please leave your four-legged friends at home. Most of the race will be run on paved farm roads and there is a lovely, short section of turf on the course.

Participants receive a long-sleeved, dri-fit shirt and goodie bag. Medals will be awarded to the top three finishers of each age group and overall male and female winners will receive an engraved julep cup. Packet pick-up will be on Monday, September 26th between 5:30 pm and 8:30 pm  at the Blue Stallion Brewing Co..  10% of all proceeds will go to the life adventure center. Please note that there will be NO RACE DAY REGISTRATION. You can pick up your race packet the morning of the race, but we strongly suggest you pick it up on Thursday, if possible.

Race proceeds will benefit the Life Adventure Center in Versailles, which provides programs and camps for military veterans with PTSD, and their families. If you are on limited turn out or are retired from racing, you can still help by volunteering on race day, so please sign up! Hope to see you there!